Patients report varying levels of pain when waking up from surgery and throughout their recovery process. At your pre-operative visit with the surgeon, ask what level of pain you can expect following surgery and whether prescription pain medications will be used to manage post-operative pain.  

Due to the opioid crisis (i.e., widespread problems with opiate addiction), there is a big drive to reduce nonessential prescriptions of opioid pain medications (e.g. Morphine/Codeine), so they are used sparingly. OTC medications (such as NSAID, Tylenol, paracetamol, etc) are more commonly used to manage post-surgical pain. 

Throughout the process, it is important to tell your care team about any pain you experience so that they can provide appropriate pain relief medications. 

Trapped gas pain
During laparoscopic abdominal surgery, gas (commonly carbon dioxide) is used to ‘inflate’ the abdomen - giving the surgeon more room and a better view of your internal organs. Many report waking up with stomach and shoulder pain where the gas has moved post-op. Pain medication can help - as well as gentle movement where possible.

Tip from patient advisory team: "Some find that heat pads on their abdomen help, so do request them where possible" Also - "Don't let the pain build up before you request any painkillers - if the hospital is busy they can take a while to get to you so it's a good idea to request them as soon as you can feel it starting".

Visit www.iapmd.org/surgery for lots of evidence-based information and resources for those considering, going through or recovering from surgery for PMDD/PME.


Visit www.iapmd.org/surgery for lots of evidence based information and resources for those considering, going through or recovering from surgery for PMDD/PME.

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